Crocker exhibits student self-portraits

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Crocker exhibits student self-portraits

(COURTESY/JOYCE HENRY)

(COURTESY/JOYCE HENRY)

(COURTESY/JOYCE HENRY)

(COURTESY/JOYCE HENRY)

GABI HUTSON

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Five art students in Joyce Henry’s integrated art class got to see their work hanging on the walls of the Crocker Art Museum after Henry submitted their pieces to be showcased in an exhibit.

The exhibit, a “long-standing tradition,” features high school art from around the region, including submissions from private art-exclusive schools or other competitive art programs. The self-portraits will remain in showcase until May 28.

With approximately eleven schools participating, and a limit set on how many pieces could be accepted from each school, junior Art 3 student Halli Dalebout was grateful to see her own work accepted.

“It was a pretty big show, there was a lot of pieces, and it wasn’t just like two schools competing against each other,” Dalebout said. “There was I think 48 people who got awards or something like that. It was huge even to get accepted out of your class. To go there was an honor.”

Henry offered the opportunity to submit for the exhibit as an assignment to her integrated Art 3, Art 4, and AP Art class. Dalebout, along with juniors Viktoria Barr, Sabrina Roa, and seniors Morgan Jamison and Zoe Stevens, all had their work displayed in the Sacramento museum.

For senior AP 2D Art student Zoe Stephens, this was her second time in the museum and the second year she was given the award for “Best in Medium.”

Stevens found that for this year’s exhibit she was more prepared and new what to expect from the museum.

“The second time around it was interesting because I knew what to expect,” Stevens said. “I was very excited to win. I didn’t expect it because the competition there is very stiff.”
Art 3 student Barr was shocked that she and her fellow student were admitted to the showcase amongst the heavy competition.

“We were all like, ‘What? This is so formal,’” Barr said. “We didn’t know that it was gonna be like this crazy and it was intimidating because a lot of the other students were also very good.”

Barr found the experience humbling to be featured in a museum full of work from renowned and loved artists.

“It’s an honor to get into the Crocker art museum, there’s so many great artists that are shown there,” Barr said. “I went for the first time this past year for AP Art History with Leong. I went, and it was an amazing place.”

While the experience is gratifying for Barr, she wished the integrity of her art could have been more fully represented in the exhibit.

“It was on glass and the purpose of it

was supposed to be that you can see through it, or it’s like reflective in a way too,” Barr said. “They put a paper backing in it, which kind of defeats the purpose of it being see-through.”