Eye of the Tiger

Errecart builds relationships with family business

%28JOHNNY+MULLIGAN%2FEYE+OF+THE+TIGER%29+Senior+Shelbie+McKay+works+in+the+Ohana+Hawaiian+Snow+truck.+
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Errecart builds relationships with family business

(JOHNNY MULLIGAN/EYE OF THE TIGER) Senior Shelbie McKay works in the Ohana Hawaiian Snow truck.

(JOHNNY MULLIGAN/EYE OF THE TIGER) Senior Shelbie McKay works in the Ohana Hawaiian Snow truck.

(JOHNNY MULLIGAN/EYE OF THE TIGER) Senior Shelbie McKay works in the Ohana Hawaiian Snow truck.

(JOHNNY MULLIGAN/EYE OF THE TIGER) Senior Shelbie McKay works in the Ohana Hawaiian Snow truck.

CLAIRE OERTLY and VICTORIA WILKINSON

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(JOHNNY MULLIGAN/EYE OF THE TIGER) Junior Jada Kranig sells snow cones at the Junior Tigers football game.

(JOHNNY MULLIGAN/EYE OF THE TIGER) Junior Jada Kranig sells snow cones at the Junior Tigers football game.

Roseville High School teacher and varsity girls basketball coach, Josh Errecart, purchased a Hawaiian snow cone truck called Ohana Hawaiian Snow last May in hopes of bringing his family and community together through this summer job.

According to Errecart, buying the truck has made his family spend more time together, creating closer relationships.

“It’s a ton of fun, learning and working together as a family not watching TV and not playing video games,” Errecart said. “We’re kind of in a confined place with a bunch of happy people and it gets stressful at times when you’re busy but for the most part it brings the family together and the friends together.”

According to senior Shelbie McKay, who works on the truck, working with family and friends makes the truck a fun and happy environment for customers and employees alike.

“It’s not really a job that people dread,” Mckay said. “They look forward to working and are excited to work and have a good attitude about it.”

Errecart agrees and also enjoys making customers happy.

“The funnest part is that everyone’s happy,” Errecart said. “It’s not one of those jobs where you’re forcing things or forcing rules or selling things that people don’t want to spend their money on, you’re selling shave ice. You’re selling sugary delight.”

According to Errecart the best thing about working in the truck are the good reactions from the customers and bringing smiles to their faces.

“Everyone there is happy, everyone is energetic, everyone wants what you have [and] they get excited when you give it to them it’s just kind of rewarding in that regard,” Errecart said.

While the environment is more enjoyable than having a traditional job, employees still have the responsibility to know what the products are and to always put the customer first.

“We start conversations with people and ask them how their day is going and a lot of people ask what certain flavors are,” Mckay said

According to Mckay, her job allows her to not only make money but to make friendly connections as well.

“It’s kinda like a free for all to connect more with the people,” Mckay said.

Errecart grew up in Hawaii so owning this truck and getting the right vibe was easy for him.

“It’s pretty laid back, pretty low key,” Errecart said. “We try to stick with the true Hawaiian style I grew up in Hawaii so we have a lot of shave ice experience, if you will.”

According to Errecart, while working in the truck itself is easy, the work behind the scenes makes up for it.

“It’s pretty fun. It’s pretty easy working in the truck, but outside like at our house half of our garage is full of stuff to make the ice and stuff,” Errecart’s daughter junior Kaitlyn Errecart said. “It’s actually a lot of work, like an hour each night and more occasionally.”

According to Kaitlyn, her dad has gotten to know her friends over the years and because of this he knew exactly whom he wanted to work at his truck.

“My dad kinda requested them,” Kaitlyn said. “He knew who would be good for the job so he talked to them.”

About the Writers
CLAIRE OERTLY, STAFF REPORTER

[email protected]
Description
Claire Oertly is a third-year reporter. She typically writes for A&E.
Activities
Oertly bowls for Roseville High School.
Career Aspirations
Oertly wants to pursue a career in psychology.
Favorite Artist
Lil Uzi Vert.

VICTORIA WILKINSON, REPORTER

[email protected]
Description
Victoria Wilkinson has worked for Eye of the Tiger since her sophomore year. She currently writes for features and A&E.
Activities
N/A.
Career Aspirations
Wilkinson wants to study medicine.
Favorite Artist
Travis Scott.

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