Senior starts tuning to new horizons

February 7, 2020

As chords and tempo blend together, the adept strumming of a skilled musician fills the room. Instruments adorn the space: tucked lovingly under a bed, displayed proudly on the walls like treasured family artifacts. A microphone and keyboard amp dominate valuable tabletop real estate. It’s an unconventional office, but for virtuoso Julia Stoermer, it’s a stage, studio and lifestyle. 

Stoermer works by her own rhythm. She has turned sound into music, and while she has amassed an audience, the decision to share her music was a family-affair.

“My mom and my sister said I should record some of my own stuff, do something original and put it out there,” Stoermer said. “It was scary initially, but I [received] mostly good feedback so I started doing it more,” 

Her love-affair with music spans over a decade. In elementary school, Stoermer sang in the school choir. In middle school, she wet her feet and reed through clarinet as she started to develop her skills as a musician. 

It’s a different sound with each one. It conveys a different sound and message with each instrument”

— Julia Stoermer

That was when she discovered a penchant for recording music. 

“It’s a really good way to express yourself creatively and emotionally,”  Stoermer said. 

Now, Stoermer’s arsenal has grown alongside her dedication to recording — her beloved acoustic companions include the banjo, guitar, mandolin, ukulele and more. Every instrument serves a unique purpose.

“It’s a different sound with each one. It conveys a different sound and message with each instrument,” Stoermer said. 

Inspiration strikes Stoermer at random. Marked by the odd hours she keeps, the Stoermer household is filled with an ever-evolving melody. In a constant battle with the thin walls of her sister’s room, Elise Stoermer has heard it all, from the warm harmony of the banjo to the delicate tones of the kalimba.

                                                          (LUCAS GEWERTH / EYE OF THE TIGER) 
Above, Stoermer demonstrates a commitment to music in and out of the bedroom. Being in Band allows her to practice her art in a school setting.

“It’s a different sound with each one. It conveys a different sound and message with each instrument,” Elise said.

Nevertheless, their relationship has only grown stronger. While Stoermer plays, Elise provides feedback on her sister’s music. Throughout the almost three years since recording Julia first fell in love with recording, Elise has been the main witness to her sister’s exponential improvement. 

“It’s insane how good she’s gotten,” Elise said.

Instead of board games or movie nights, the sisters’ ideas of family bonding is through sharing lyrics and music. Their appreciation for all aspects of musicality has embedded itself into the roots of the Stoermer family culture.

“She’s totally inspired me – I want to learn mandolin, guitar, and drums for her so that I can help her with her music,” Elise said. “Music holds a special place in different people’s hearts, and especially in Julia’s — I want to support that.”

(JULIE NGUYEN / EYE OF THE TIGER)
Stoermer has been able to diversify her knowledge of music through various instruments, such as the kalimba, pictured above.

Julia has already taken the first steps toward sharing her music with a broader audience. Her titles, such as Fair Weather, which she wrote and recorded herself, have been shared on a variety of platforms from Spotify to YouTube to Soundcloud. 

Stoermer is open to opportunities that would allow her to further expand on her style and production of music professionally. However, the real reason that has encouraged her to stick with her acoustic companions for over a decade has remained unchanged. 

“I do it to get my feelings, thoughts, and ideas out there,” Julia said. “It’s very rewarding to have people appreciate that and see something that you made up in your head being appreciated. It’s really rad.” 

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